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13106 A. Operation of snowmobile

1. No permission given. This chapter does not give license or permission to cross or go on the property of another.

2. Stop and identify requirement. Persons operating a snowmobile upon the land of another shall stop and identify themselves upon the request of the landowner or the landowner's duly authorized representative.

A person who violates this subsection commits a Class E crime.

3. Operating snowmobile upon controlled access highway. Except as provided in paragraph A, a person may not operate a snowmobile upon a controlled access highway or within the right-of-way limits of a controlled access highway.

A. A person may operate a snowmobile upon a controlled access highway or within the right-of-way limits of a controlled access highway in accordance with this paragraph.

(1) A person on a properly registered snowmobile may cross controlled access highways by use of bridges over or roads under those highways, or by use of roads crossing controlled access highways at grade.

(2) The Commissioner of Transportation may issue special permits for designated crossings of controlled access highways.

4. Unlawfully operating snowmobile on plowed road. A person may not operate a snowmobile upon any plowed private road, or public road plowed privately without public compensation, after having been forbidden to do so by the owner thereof, the owner's agent or a municipal official, either personally or by appropriate notices posted conspicuously on that road.

5. Operating snowmobile on public way. Except as provided in subsection 4 and this subsection, a person may not operate a snowmobile upon the main traveled portion, the sidewalks or the plowed snowbanks of a public way.

A. A properly registered snowmobile may be operated on a public way only the distance necessary, but in no case to exceed 300 yards, on the extreme right of the traveled way for the purpose of crossing, as directly as possible, a public way, sidewalk or culvert.

B. A properly registered snowmobile may be operated on a public way only the distance necessary, but in no case to exceed 500 yards, on the extreme right of the traveled way for the sole purpose of crossing, as directly as possible, a bridge, overpass or underpass, provided that that operation can be made in safety and that it does not interfere with vehicular traffic approaching from either direction on the public way.

C. A snowmobile may be operated on any portion of a public way when the public way has been closed in accordance with Title 23, section 2953.

D. If the main traveled portion of a public way is publicly plowed and utilized by conventional motor vehicles, a snowmobile may be operated only on that portion of the way not maintained or utilized for the operation of conventional motor vehicles, except that operation on the left side of the way is prohibited during the hours from sunset to sunrise on the portion of the way not maintained or utilized for the operation of conventional motor vehicles. This paragraph does not apply to a snowmobile operated by a public utility regulated by the Public Utilities Commission while being operated in the course of the utility's corporate function, so that public utilities may effectively and speedily carry out their obligations to the public.

E. A snowmobile may be operated on streets and public ways during a period of emergency when the emergency has been so declared by a police agency having jurisdiction and when travel by conventional motor vehicles is not practicable. This paragraph does not apply to a snowmobile operated by a public utility regulated by the Public Utilities Commission while being operated in the course of the utility's corporate function, so that public utilities may effectively and speedily carry out their obligations to the public.

F. A snowmobile may be operated on streets and public ways in special snowmobile events of limited duration conducted according to a prearranged schedule and under a permit from the governmental unit having jurisdiction.

G. Notwithstanding paragraphs A to F, a snowmobile may be operated on the extreme right of a public way within the built-up portion of a municipality or unorganized or unincorporated township if the appropriate governmental unit has designated the public way as a snowmobile-access route for the purpose of allowing snowmobiles access to places of business. A public way designated by an appropriate governmental unit as a snowmobile-access route must be posted conspicuously at regular intervals by that governmental unit with highly visible signs designating the snowmobile-access route. Before designating a public way as a snowmobile-access route, the appropriate governmental unit shall make appropriate determinations that snowmobile travel on the extreme right of the public way may be conducted safely and will not interfere with vehicular traffic on the public way. For purposes of this paragraph, "appropriate governmental unit" means the Department of Transportation, county commissioners or municipal officers within their respective jurisdictions. The jurisdiction of each appropriate governmental unit over public ways pursuant to this paragraph is the same as its jurisdiction over the passage of vehicles on public ways pursuant to Title 29-A, section 2395. Municipal or county law enforcement officials having jurisdiction have primary enforcement authority over any route established under this paragraph.

6. Failing to stop snowmobile before entering public way. A person shall bring a snowmobile to a complete stop before entering a public way or a private way maintained for travel.

7. Failing to yield right-of-way while operating snowmobile. A person shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicular traffic while operating a snowmobile on a public way or a private way maintained for travel.

8. Crossing a closed bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass with snowmobile. This subsection applies to the crossing with a snowmobile of a bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass closed to snowmobiles by the Commissioner of Transportation.

A. A person may not cross with a snowmobile a bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass closed to snowmobiles by the Commissioner of Transportation.

(1) The Commissioner of Transportation may, following a public hearing, prohibit the crossing of an individual bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass if the commissioner determines that that crossing or use of the public way is hazardous.

(2) Any bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass closed by the Commissioner of Transportation must be posted by appropriate notices.

9. Reckless operation of snowmobile. A person may not operate a snowmobile in such a way as to recklessly create a substantial risk of serious bodily injury to another person. Violation of this subsection is a Class D crime.

10. Operating snowmobile to endanger. A person may not operate a snowmobile so as to endanger any person or property by:

A. Operating the snowmobile except at a reasonable and prudent speed for the existing conditions, including when approaching and crossing an intersection or railway grade crossing, when approaching and taking a curve, when approaching a hill crest, when traveling upon any narrow or winding trail and when a special hazard exists with respect to pedestrians, skiers or other traffic by reason of weather or trail conditions; or

B. Operating the snowmobile in a manner that fails to control its speed at all times as necessary to avoid colliding with any person, vehicle, snowmobile or other object on or adjacent to the snowmobile trail.

A person who violates this subsection commits a Class E crime.

11. Operating snowmobile at greater than reasonable and prudent speed. A person may not operate a snowmobile except at a reasonable and prudent speed for the existing conditions.

A person who violates this subsection commits a Class E crime.

12. Operating a snowmobile while underage. A person under 14 years of age may not operate a snowmobile across any public way maintained for travel.

13. Permitting unaccompanied child to operate snowmobile. A person may not permit a child under 10 years of age to operate a snowmobile unless the child is accompanied by an adult.

This subsection does not apply on land that is owned by the parent or guardian or on land where permission for use has been granted to the parent or guardian.

14. Snowmobile noise level limits. This subsection governs noise levels for snowmobiles.

A. Except as provided in section 13112, a person may not:

(1) Operate a snowmobile that exceeds the noise limits for that snowmobile established in paragraph B; or

(2) Modify a snowmobile in a manner that amplifies or otherwise increases total noise emission above that of the snowmobile as originally constructed, regardless of the date of manufacture.

B. The following noise levels are established:

(1) Every snowmobile manufactured after February 1, 1975, and offered for sale or sold in this State must be constructed to limit total vehicle noise to not more than 78 decibels of sound pressure level at 50 feet on the "A" scale, as measured by the SAE standards J-192;

(2) Snowmobiles manufactured after October 1, 1973, but on or before February 1, 1975, and offered for sale or sold in this State must be constructed to limit the total vehicle noise to not more than 82 decibels of sound pressure level at 50 feet on the "A" scale, as measured by the SAE standards J-192; and

(3) Snowmobiles manufactured on or before October 1, 1973 are not subject to a specific noise level, except that they may not be modified in violation of this subsection.

15. Snowmobile headlight and taillight equipment requirements. Except as provided in section 13112, a person may not operate a snowmobile that is not equipped as provided in this subsection.

A. A person may not operate a snowmobile unless the snowmobile has mounted: (1) On the front at least one headlight capable of casting a white beam for a distance of at least 100 feet directly ahead of the snowmobile; and

(2) On the rear at least one lamp capable of displaying a red light visible at a distance of at least 100 feet behind the snowmobile.

16. Failure to use snowmobile lights. Except as provided in section 13112, a person shall use lights as specified in this subsection.

A. A person shall use snowmobile lights:

(1) During the period from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise; and

(2) At any time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions caused by fog or otherwise, other persons, vehicles and other objects are not clearly discernible for a distance of 500 feet ahead.

17. Unlawfully operating snowmobile on railroad tracks. The following provisions govern the operation of a snowmobile on railroad tracks or railroad rights-of-way.

A. A person may not operate a snowmobile along or adjacent and parallel to the tracks of a railroad within the limits of a railroad right-of-way without written permission from the railroad owning the right-of-way.

B. A person may not operate a snowmobile across the tracks of a railroad after having been forbidden to do so by the railroad owning the railroad right-of-way, or by an agent of that railroad, either personally or by appropriate notices posted conspicuously along the railroad right-of-way.

C. Notwithstanding this subsection, a person may operate a snowmobile on railroad tracks if the person is operating within the right-of-way of a portion of railroad line that has been officially abandoned under the authority of the Interstate Commerce Commission.

18. Operating snowmobile in cemetery. A person may not operate a snowmobile in any cemetery, burial place or burying ground.

19. Operating too close to certain buildings. A person may not operate a snowmobile within 200 feet of a dwelling, hospital, nursing home, convalescent home or church. A. This subsection does not apply when a person is operating a snowmobile:

(1) On public ways in accordance with subsections 5, 6, 7 and 8 or on controlled access highways in accordance with subsection 3, paragraph A;

(2) On the frozen surface of any body of water; and

(3) On land the operator owns or is permitted to use.

20. Abuse of another person's property. A person may not while operating a snowmobile:

A. Tear down or destroy a fence or wall on another person's land;

B. Leave open a gate or bar on another person's land; or

C. Trample or destroy crops on another person's land.

A person who violates this subsection commits a Class E crime.

21. Snowmobile owner; operation by another. A person is in violation of this subsection if that person is the owner of a snowmobile that is operated in violation of this chapter.

22. Parent or guardian; operation by minor. A person is in violation of this subsection if that person is the parent or guardian responsible for the care of a minor under 18 years of age who is operating a snowmobile in violation of this chapter.

23. Operating snowmobile on open water. A person may not operate or attempt to operate a snowmobile on open water. For purposes of this subsection, "open water" means any area of an inland water body that is free of ice and snow. This subsection does not apply to private ponds.

Notwithstanding Title 17, section 2267-A, subsection 3, the owner or operator of a snowmobile that has been submerged or partially submerged as a result of a violation of this subsection shall remove the snowmobile within 24 hours of its submersion. The owner or operator of a snowmobile submerged or partially submerged as a result of a violation of this subsection shall pay any damages resulting from the submersion or removal. If the owner or operator of a snowmobile submerged or partially submerged as the result of a violation of this subsection fails to remove the snowmobile within 24 hours of its submersion, the commissioner may remove the snowmobile at the expense of the owner or operator or request in writing that the court direct the owner or operator to remove the snowmobile immediately.

24. Headgear required. This subsection applies to snowmobile trails funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund of the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Public Lands.

A. A person operating a snowmobile on a snowmobile trail identified by the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands as having been funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund pursuant to section 1893, subsection 3:

(1) If the person is under 18 years of age, shall wear protective headgear that conforms to the standards established under Title 29-A, section 2083, subsection 3; and

(2) May not carry a passenger under 18 years of age on the snowmobile unless the passenger is wearing protective headgear that conforms to the standards established under Title 29-A, section 2083, subsection 3.

B. The Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands shall develop an administratively simple means of identifying trails that have been funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund so that snowmobile riders can readily determine to which trails this subsection applies.

25. Operating snowmobile left of center of snowmobile trail. A person may not operate a snowmobile to the left of the center on a snowmobile trail that is funded in whole or part by the Snowmobile Trail Fund when approaching or navigating a curve, corner, grade, or hill.

TRAIL ETHICS

1) I will always operate at a reasonable and prudent speed for trail conditions;

2) I will always drive to the right side of the trail and park to the right in single file or stop off the edge of the groomed surface;

3) I will not pass unless recognized and motioned to pass by the snowmobile operator ahead;

4) I will respect the trail groomer operator and leave the trail in the same condition I found it;

5) I will not drink and drive;

6) I will not ride on plowed roads except at legal crossings.



Other Snowmobiling Links

Snowmobiling - Welcome to Northern Maine, the best snowmobile trail riding experience in the eastern U.S. Some trails in Aroostook are converted railroad beds, while others may traverse a power line up and over large rolling hills that capture the picturesque beauty of the landscape. Summer roads, abandoned logging roads and other club trails lead the snowmobiler to spectacular sites of snow-laden spruce maple and birch forests. You can snowmobile over the crest of a hill and look out at the variety of terrain "The County" has to offer.

Snowmobile Laws and Regulations - Snowmobile Laws and Regulations

Registration and Title - Registration and Title

Dealer`s Registration and License - Dealer`s Registration and License

Landowner Liabilities - Landowner Liabilities

Reporting Accidents - Reporting Accidents

Operation of Snowmobile & Trail Ethics - Operation of Snowmobile & Trail Ethics

Reciprocity Laws - Reciprocity Laws

Noise Limitations - Noise Limitations

Dealer, Repair Shop, Rental Registration - Dealer, Repair Shop, Rental Registration

Canadian Border Crossing Notes - Canadian Border Crossing Notes

Northern Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map - Northern Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map

Central Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map - Central Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map

Southern Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map - Southern Aroostook County Area Snowmobile Trail Map

Katahdin Area Snowmobile Trail Map - Katahdin Area Snowmobile Trail Map

Snowmobile Clubs - Northern Maine is a snowmobiling mecca, and we have clubs that generously support your great riding experience. Join a club today!

 

 

 

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